Speaker Profiles

 

 

Nancy AnojaNancy Anoja, MSc, CCGC, Genetic Counsellor, Montreal Neurological Hospital

Nancy Anoja graduated in 2009 from Université de Montréal in genetic counselling and has been a Canadian Certified Genetic Counsellor since 2011. She has worked in a clinical setting since then; including four years in cancer genetics and one year with Orphanet-Quebec, gathering resources that are available as Orphanet’s reference portal.

During the last 2 years, Nancy has worked at the Montreal Neurological Hospital, working as part of a multidisciplinary clinic for the Movement disorder clinic, ALS clinic and Neurogenetic/Neuromuscular clinic. Working closely with specialized clinicians, researchers, nurse specialists and the clinical trial research unit, has allowed her to refine her knowledge and counselling skills specific in neurodegenerative diseases.

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Melyssa Aronson, MS, (C)CGC, Senior Genetic Counsellor, Zane Cohen Centre for Digestive Diseases, Mount Sinai Hospital

Melyssa has been a genetic counsellor at the Zane Cohen Centre for Digestive Diseases since 1998, and the senior genetic counsellor since 2000. The Centre provides clinical counselling and testing for individuals suspected of having a hereditary GI cancer syndrome and runs a research Registry, collecting medical and biospecimen information on thousands of patients since 1980 to better understand the causes, treatment and prevention of hereditary cancer. Melyssa began her work in Toronto by overseeing the Ontario Familial Colorectal Cancer Registry, a population-based colorectal provincial registry and part of the international collaborative family registries.

Melyssa has served on numerous boards for the Ontario Ministry of Health and Cancer Care Ontario to establish criteria for hereditary GI cancer genetic testing and cancer screening for the public health care system in Ontario. In 2016, she lead a committee to establish revisions to the current provincial testing guidelines for GI cancer that will be presented to the MOH.

In 2010, an international BMMRD consortium was established in Toronto by Drs. Uri Tabori, Carol Durno and Melyssa Aronson. To date, 70 BMMRD families from 5 continents and over 20 countries have joined making it the largest BMMRD consortium in the world. Melyssa authored the first paper on the GI findings in these families, published in 2015.

Melyssa is also an instructor and clinical supervisor for the Master’s level genetic counselling students at the University of Toronto and is a course director for the cancer genetic course for this program.

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Deepti BabuDeepti Babu, MS, CGC, Clinical Content Manager, Ambry Genetics

Deepti Babu earned her Master’s in Human Genetics/Genetic Counseling from Sarah Lawrence College. After practicing genetic counselling in various specialties for 15 years, she merged her passions for the field and writing into a new role as Clinical Content Manager at Ambry Genetics in 2014. There, she manages written content across multiple channels coming to/from the Marketing department.

Deepti was Executive Editor of the National Society of Genetic Counselors’ member publication, Perspectives in Genetic Counseling, for five years. During this time, she led a team to transition it to an interactive digital magazine. From 2014-2016, she was Co-Editor and co-led a similar transition for Crossover, the member publication of the Canadian Association of Genetic Counsellors.

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Claire BascunanaClaire Bascuñana, Jewish General Hospital

Claire Bascuñana is a CAGC-certified genetic counsellor currently working at the Jewish General Hospital in Prenatal Diagnosis and Hereditary Cancer clinics. Her past experience includes the coordination and recruitment of patients for the Quebec Pancreas Cancer Study. She has several scientific publications highlighting translational and clinical genetics research on pancreatic cancer. Her academic background also includes degrees in Bioethics and Biomedical Sciences. She is faculty lecturer at McGill University and is actively involved in the supervision and teaching of the Genetic Counselling students.

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Angela BedardAngela Bedard, Genetic Counsellor, BC Cancer Agency

Angela Bedard is a genetic counsellor with the BC Cancer Agency’s Hereditary Cancer Program. Previously she worked as a genetic counsellor and clinical lecturer at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. She developed interest in research during her graduate training at the University of Cincinnati; her thesis work was ‘Career research interests and training of genetic counseling students.’ Since that time, she has also held other professional roles, including Director of an Infusion/Cancer Program in Alamosa, Colorado, and Program Leader with the BC Cancer Agency’s Provincial Cancer Survivorship Program. In 2014, she presented a study at the CAGC conference ‘Genetic Testing and Life Insurance: A Review of Canadian Life Insurance Companies’. Angela lives in Abbotsford, BC, with her husband, daughter, and two Labrador retrievers.

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Yves BerthiaumeYves Berthiaume, M.D., MSc, Executive Director of the Clinic and Clinical Research, Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal

Professor, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal. Director, of the Cellular and Molecular Lung Biology research unit at the IRCM. Recipient of the IRCM Gosselin-Lamarre Chair in clinical research. His research interests focus on the role of lung epithelial cells in the pathophysiology of diseases such as cystic fibrosis or pulmonary oedema. More specifically, he is working to shed light on the interaction between the inflammatory response and epithelial dysfunction in these diseases. More recently, he has also explored the interaction of the inflammatory response with the development of cystic fibrosis related diabetes.

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Nathalie BolducNathalie Bolduc, MSc, CCGC, CGC, Senior Territory Manager & Genetic Counsellor, LifeLabs Genetics

Nathalie Bolduc received her master degree in genetic counselling from McGill University. She is currently the Senior Territory Manager for Quebec & Atlantic Canada for LifeLabs Genetics. Throughout her practice, she has worked in several clinical settings including cancer genetics, prenatal diagnosis, reproductive technologies, pediatric genetics and adult genetics. From 2008 to 2015, she was the point person for genetic services and predictive testing for Huntington disease in the province of Quebec. She is involved in supervision and teaching of genetic counselling students. She was the president of the Quebec Association of Genetic Counsellors from 2007 to 2013. She was a member of the CAGC Professional Governance Committee and is currently the president-elect of the CAGC.

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Adeline CuggiaAdeline Cuggia, McGill University Health Center

Adeline Cuggia’s research interests began during her biotechnology bachelors’ degree at Université de Sherbrooke with multiple internships in research laboratories. After acquiring experience in teaching and pedagogy, she creatively combined these skills with her long standing passion for genetics and proceeded to complete her genetic counselling degree at Université de Montréal in 2014. From 2014 to 2015, she functioned as a genetic counsellor at the Quebec Coalition for Rare Diseases and has been the research coordinator and genetic counsellor running the Quebec Pancreas Cancer Study at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Center since 2015.

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Heather DouglasHeather Douglas, Genetic Counsellor, Rouge Valley Health System

Heather Douglas is a clinical genetic counsellor working at Rouge Valley Health System in Scarborough, Ontario.

Heather received her Bachelor’s degree in Life Sciences from Queen’s University in 2004. She did a Master’s in Neuroscience at Queen’s, studying stroke, migraine and brain trauma, graduating in 2006. While she loved the lab-based research, she ‘caught the genetic counselling bug’ and was admitted to the University of Pittsburgh’s genetic counselling program. Her thesis there examined the effects of BRCA testing on family relationships.

Heather has been at Rouge Valley since 2008. Her main areas of practice are prenatal and cancer, although she also sees pediatric, adult and cardiogenetic cases. In 2013, she felt the need to broaden her psychosocial skills, so she studied Grief and Bereavement Counselling at George Brown College, finishing in 2014. She published an article in the Journal of Genetic Counseling looking at how to incorporate meaning-making grief theory into genetic counselling practice. She is excited to share what she has learned with her colleagues.

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William FoulkesWilliam Foulkes, MBBS, FRCPC, PhD, Professor, McGill University, MUHC

William Foulkes, MBBS PhD FRCP FRCPC is a clinician-scientist who investigates the causes and consequences of inherited cancers. He trained in medicine at Barts Hospital in London and completed his training, in cancer genetics, at McGill, where he is presently a James McGill Professor in the Departments of Human Genetics, Medicine and Oncology. In addition to his contributions to our knowledge of inherited susceptibility to cancer, he has played a major role in translating research findings to the clinic, most extensively on susceptibility to breast, colorectal and ovarian cancer. In 2005, he established the BRCA symposium, a biennial international symposium on hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, which has become the leading conference in the world on this subject. Recently, he began to investigate rare pediatric cancer susceptibility syndromes, such as that caused by germ-line mutations in the gene called DICER1. He has published over 400 papers, many in leading journals including Nature Genetics, the New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA and the Journal of the National Cancer Institute; his work has been cited over 15,000 times. He is an Associate Editor of the Journal of Pathology. In 2010, Dr. Foulkes was made a Scholar of the Susan G. Komen Foundation (US), and in 2013 he was awarded the prestigious O. Harold Warwick Prize for Cancer Control of the Canadian Cancer Society. He was elected to the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences in 2014.

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Johannie Gagnon, MSc, CCGC, Montreal Heart Institute

After obtaining her undergraduate degree in pharmacology at Université de Sherbrooke in 2008, Johannie Gagnon did her Masters in Genetic Counselling at Université de Montréal in 2010. She then went on a 2 year replacement at Hôpital de Chicoutimi in general genetics. In 2013, she started a research position at McGill University on a project for breast cancer risk stratification, which she still involved in. There she worked on the development of guidelines for the use of the stratification and screening of women and a website for health professionals. She also worked at the Douglas hospital for two years on a clinical research position, recruiting patients for two studies on autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease. In 2016, she started a clinical position at the Montreal Heart Institute.

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Clare GibbonsClare Gibbons, MS, Genetic Counsellor, North York General Hospital

Clare Gibbons received a Master of Science degree in Genetic Counseling from Sarah Lawrence College in 1996 and then joined the Genetics Program at North York General Hospital in Toronto. She is an American Board and Canadian Board certified genetic counsellor. She currently works in a general genetics clinic seeing a wide variety of patients and is a member of the Multidisciplinary Huntington Disease Clinic (HD).

She is actively involved in a number Huntington disease related research projects including the lead study coordinator for two clinical trials for treatments for HD symptoms and a large international observational study called Enroll HD. She has also been an investigator in two research projects related to disclosing HD information to at risk children and computerized working memory training for individuals with HD.

She was the study coordinator for three NIPT studies. She is currently involved in a lab test development research project for a new test called a liquid biopsy which may have applications for cancer treatment and screening.

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Taila HartleyTaila Hartley, BSc, MSc, MSc, Research Genetic Counsellor, CARE for RARE, CHEO Research Institute

Taila Hartley is a research genetic counsellor at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) Research Institute in Ottawa, Canada. She completed her Master’s degree in Biochemistry at the University of Toronto and her Master’s degree in Genetic Counselling at the University of British Columbia. She is the Operations Director for CARE for RARE, a collaborative pan-Canadian research project configured to improve the diagnosis and treatment of rare diseases.

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Ny Hoang, MS, CGC, Research Genetic Counsellor, Hospital for Sick Children

Ny Hoang is a genetic counsellor in the Autism Research Unit at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. For the past 4 years she has been a member of the research team led by Dr. Stephen Scherer studying the genetic contributions in autism spectrum disorder. Her role on the research team involves providing feedback to research participants/families about microarray analysis and whole genome sequencing results. She is also involved in teaching and supervising students in the genetic counselling program at the University of Toronto. Ny earned her Master of Science degree at Sarah Lawrence College and is certified by the American Board of Genetic Counseling.

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Jaime JessenJaime Jessen, MSc, CCGC, CGC, Genetic Counsellor, Impact Genetics

After obtaining an undergraduate biology degree at York University 2000, Jaime moved to Newcastle, Australia and completed her Masters of Science in Genetic Counselling from Newcastle University in 2005. She subsequently obtained certification by the American Board of Genetic Counseling and the Canadian Association of Genetic Counsellors (CAGC) in 2011. After working as a prenatal genetic counsellor at Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, for nine years, she took a position at Impact Genetics.

Jaime has spent time volunteering in various capacities for the genetic counselling profession. She has chaired the Direct to Consumer CAGC committee, has been an active member of multiple NSGC special interest groups and speaking at patient/caregiver meetings throughout North America.

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Yann Joly, Ph.D. (DCL) Ad.E., Associate Professor, McGill University

Yann Joly, Ph.D. (DCL) Ad.E. is a Lawyer Emeritus from the Quebec Bar and the Research Director of the Centre of Genomics and Policies (CGP). He is an Associate Professor at the Faculty of Medicine, Department of Human Genetics cross-appointed at the Bioethics Unit, at McGill University and a Research Fellow at the Fonds de recherche du Québec- Santé (FRQS).

Yann is the Data Access Officer of the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC), the Chair of the CPTP Data Access Committee and, a member of the Human Genome Organization (HUGO) Committee on Ethics, Law and Society (CELS). He is also a member of the Canadian Commission for UNESCO.

His research interests lie at the interface of the fields of intellectual property, health law (biotechnology and other emerging health technologies) and bioethics. Yann has published his findings in over a hundred peer-reviewed articles featured in top legal, ethical and scientific journals. He served as a legal advisor on multiple research ethics committees in the public and private sectors. Yann also sits on editorial committees and acts as a reviewer for a wide range of publications in his field. In 2012, he received the Quebec Bar Award of Merit (Innovation) for his work on the right to privacy in the biomedical field.

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Bartha Maria KnoppersBartha Maria Knoppers, Ph.D., Ad.E., O.C., O.Q., FCAHS, Director, Centre of Genomics and Policy, McGill University

Bartha Maria Knoppers, PhD (Comparative Medical Law), holds the Canada Research Chair in Law and Medicine (Tier 1: 2001 – ). Director of the Centre of Genomics and Policy, Faculty of Medicine, Human Genetics, McGill University she is the founder of the Population Project in Genomics and Society (P3G) and CARTaGENE Quebec’s population biobank (30,000 indiv.). Chair of the Ethics Working Party of the International Stem Cell Forum (2005-2016); Co-Chair of the Sampling/ELSI Committee of the 1000 Genomes Project (2007-2014); Scientific Steering Committee Member of the International Cancer Genome Consortium (2009- ); Chair, Regulatory and Ethics Working Group – Co-Founder and Member, Transitional Steering Committee of the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health. She holds four Doctorates Honoris Causa, is Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences; and Officer of the Order of Canada and of Quebec. She received the “Prix Montreal In Vivo: Secteur des sciences de la vie et des technologies de la santé” in 2012 and was named “Champion of Genetics” by the Canadian Gene Cure Foundation (2013). In 2014, she was named “Great Montrealer”, Scientific Sector, by the Board of Trade of Metropolitan Montreal, and in 2015 she received the Medal Paul-André Crépeau for her work in comparative medical law (The Canadian Bar Association: Quebec).

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Carlo ParibelloCarlo Paribello, M.S.M., M.D., Fragile X Research Foundation of Canada

Dr. Carlo Paribello is a family physician and has been practicing medicine in Ontario since 1986. He is in private practice in Brampton, Ontario, and is an attending physician and the Medical Director at The Elm Grove Living Centre in Toronto. Dr. Paribello, along with his wife Barbara, established the Fragile X Research Foundation of Canada (FXRFC) in 1997, two years after two of their four young sons were diagnosed with Fragile X syndrome. The Fragile X Research Foundation of Canada is a non-profit organization which is dedicated to funding biomedical research for improved treatment and, ultimately, a cure for fragile X.

In 2003, Dr. Paribello was one of 30 outstanding Canadians honoured by Governor General Adrienne Clarkson with the Meritorious Service Medal (M.S.M.). The M.S.M. is conferred on “individuals who have performed an exceptional deed or an activity that has brought honour to their community or to Canada.” To quote the award’s official citation, Dr. Paribello’s accomplishments “has brought international recognition to Canada and to the tremendous strides Canadian researchers are making in the field of genetic research.”

In 2006, Dr. Paribello started the first dedicated Fragile X Clinic at Surrey Place Centre in Toronto. The clinic served to provide a facility where affected patients and their families could access physicians with the expertise and knowledge to treat this neuropsychiatric disorder. It also became the first Canadian centre to conduct clinical trials with new drugs aimed at enhancing learning, memory and cognitive functioning.

In 2010, Dr. Paribello made a significant contribution to the field of neuroscience and autism when he published the positive results of his ground-breaking open label trial using minocycline as a possible targeted molecular therapy to treat Fragile X.

In 2012 Dr. Paribello moved the Fragile X clinic to his office in Brampton, and began conducting clinical drug trials for Novartis and Roche Pharmaceuticals in order to test potential new treatments for Fragile X.

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Dominique Ouellet, Ph.D., CHU de Québec/Laval University

Dominique Ouellet graduated from Laval University in 2009 and did a first postdoctoral training at the Beckman Research Institute at City of Hope, California with Dr. John J. Rossi. She worked on therapeutic approaches using RNA molecules (miRNA, siRNA, ribozymes) designed to counteract HIV gene expression, and delivered to cells with lentiviruses.

She joined the laboratory of Jacques P. Tremblay at CHU de Québec/ Laval University in September 2013. She is been using the CRISPR/Cas9 system for the correction of mutated genes involved in the Friedreich Ataxia (FRDA) and the Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) diseases. She is also developing an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector capable to deliver CRISPR components and to limit off-target effects in a mouse model of FRDA.

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Leah Pink, MN, NP-Adult, Nurse Practitioner, Mount Sinai Hospital

Leah Pink MN, NP-Adult is a Nurse Practitioner who has been with the Wasser Pain Management Centre, Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto since 2008. Her current interests are in chronic pain, including pelvic pain, chronic pain and pregnancy, and pain and chemical dependency. Leah completed her undergraduate degree in nursing in 2000, her Master of Nursing in 2005 and the Post-Masters Nurse Practitioner program in 2014, all at the University of Toronto. While chronic pain management has been her focus, she has also worked in a number of other areas, including high risk pregnancy at Women’s College Hospital in Toronto, critical care at SickKids Hospital in Toronto as well as in nursing research at the University of Toronto.

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William PirjamaliWilliam Pirjamali, M.Sc., Genetic Counsellor, TBRHSC Genetics Program

William Pirjamali is a Genetic Counsellor at the Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre. He completed his Master’s in Genetic Counselling at McGill University—class of 2016—after receiving a Bachelor of Sciences in Genetics at the University of Western Ontario in London. He is currently serving as a member of the CAGC Social Media Committee.

William is a big baseball fan and is a supporter of the Toronto Blue Jays.

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Laura Robb, MSc, CGC, Genetic Counsellor, Montreal Heart Institute

Laura Robb is a long time CAGC member who has worked in various areas of the medical milieu. Her genetic work experience includes clinical and research contributions in paediatrics, infertility, prenatal screening, laboratory services and adult onset conditions including hereditary cancer, cardiac and Alzheimer disease. She has additionally delved into the milieu of health care technology and service evaluation, as well as been involved with genetic counselling training programs. She has applied her experience at the McGill University Hospital Centre, PROCREA clinics, the Université de Montreal Hospital Centre, VM Medical Clinic, the Montreal Heart Institute and the McGill Centre for Studies in Aging.

At the Montreal Heart Institute she has been implicated in the establishment and development of the Cardiovascular Genetic Centre whose mission involves interweaving innovative strategies for the diagnosis and management of hereditary heart conditions with knowledge translation in order to effectively promote preventative health care. Her current interests include adult genetic services, models of genetic service delivery and the professional development of genetic counsellors.

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Carleigh RobertsonCarleigh Robertson, MSc, Genetic Counsellor, Health Sciences North

Carleigh Robertson is a genetic counsellor at Health Sciences North in Sudbury, Ontario. She received a Master of Science in Genetic Counselling from McGill University in 2016, during which time she completed her thesis project entitled The Experiences of Transgender Individuals in Cancer Genetic Counselling: A Qualitative Exploration.

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Pedro Rosa-NetoPedro Rosa-Neto, MD, PhD, Neurologist, McGill University

Dr. Pedro Rosa-Neto MD (Federal University Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil) PhD (Aarhus University PET Centre, Denmark) is an assistant professor of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry at McGill University, affiliated to the Douglas Research Centre. He is a clinical neurologist with expertise in quantification of brain function using imaging techniques, in particular Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Dr. Rosa-Neto’s research interests focus on imaging biomarkers for neurodegenerative diseases. He directs the laboratory for translational neuroimaging, which aims to use imaging techniques to advance the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease to a preclinical stage. Dr. Rosa-Neto research is funded by Alzheimer’s Association USA (Alzheimer’s Association Young Investigator), Canadian Foundation for innervation (CFI) , Fonds de la Recherche en Santé du Québec (FRSQ), Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and Nussia & André Aisenstadt Foundation.

Dr. Rosa-Neto also conducts research on new treatments to prevent and treat dementia symptoms at the McGill Alzheimer’s disease research Unit.

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  • Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer Disease, its Pathophysiology, Clinical Presentations and Clinical Trials

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Dessa SadovnickA. Dessa Sadovnick, Ph.D., Professor, Medical Genetics and Neurology, University of British Columbia

Dr. Sadovnick is a Professor in the Department of Medical Genetics and the Faculty of Medicine, Division of Neurology, UBC. She was the Director of the Western Pacific Regional Research and Training Center for Multiple Sclerosis (MS), established by the MS Society of Canada.

Dr. Sadovnick was a Developer and then Co-director of the Genetic Counselling Training Programme at UBC. Dr. Sadovnick is the Principal Investigator of several multicenter Canadian and International collaborative research projects on Multiple Sclerosis and pediatric Multiple Sclerosis as well as dementia. She has published extensively (over 300 articles in peer-review journals) and serves as a reviewer for a wide variety of medical journals and grant review panels.

Dr. Sadovnick is a member of several National and International advisory groups and task forces for MS and dementia.

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Kimberley Seath, University of British Columbia

Kim Seath is a Genetic Counsellor currently working in the UBC Department of Medical Genetics at BC Children’s and Women’s Health Centre. Kim graduated from the UBC Genetic Counselling Masters Program in 2006. Prior to that, she completed an undergraduate degree in Cell and Molecular Biology through Simon Fraser University. She is certified by both the Canadian Association of Genetic Counsellors; as well as, the American Board of Genetic Counseling. She has been in her current clinical position for ten years, providing genetic counselling to both prenatal and general genetics patients.

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Andrea SecordAndrea Secord, MSc, CGC,CCGC, Genetic Counsellor, GeneDx

Andrea Secord is a graduate of McGill University and certified by both the CAGC and the ABGC. She worked at the McGill University Health Center as a clinical genetic counsellor in pediatric and prenatal genetics for eight years. In that role, she was actively involved in teaching and supervising genetic counselling students and medical residents. In 2013, Andrea became the second Canadian representative for GeneDx, where she continues to learn new ways to apply her genetic counselling skills to this industry role. She has been an active member of the CAGC for over 11 years and currently sits on the Board of Directors as the Eastern Representative.

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Michael SzegoMichael Szego, PhD, MHSc, University of Toronto and St. Joseph’s Health Centre

Dr. Szego is currently a clinical ethicist and the acting director of the Centre for Clinical Ethics (a joint venture of St. Michael’s Hospital, St. Joseph’s Health Centre and Providence Healthcare). Michael is also an assistant professor in the Dalla Lana School of Public Health and the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto and a research ethics consultant with The Centre for Applied Genomics at the Hospital for Sick Children. Michael’s current research interests involve ethical issues associated with whole genome sequencing and the integration of ethics into clinical care.

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Ronni TeitelbaumRonni Teitelbaum, MSc, CCGC, CGC, Genetic Counsellor, Mount Sinai Hospital

Ronni Teitelbaum has been a prenatal genetic counsellor at Mount Sinai Hospital’s Prenatal Diagnosis and Medical Genetics Program in Toronto since 2002. She received a Master of Science in Genetic Counselling from the University of British Columbia, and is both CCGC and CGC board certified. Ronni is an active volunteer member of Sinai Health System, Human Rights & Health Equity Office – “Pride is Good for Your Health Committee”.

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Rachel VannesteRachel Vanneste, PreventionGenetics

After obtaining an undergraduate biochemistry degree at the University of Saskatchewan in 2006, Rachel Vanneste moved to Montreal and completed her Masters of Science in Genetic Counselling from McGill University in 2008. She subsequently obtained certification by the American Board of Genetic Counseling and the Canadian Association of Genetic Counsellors (CAGC) in 2009. After working as a prenatal genetic counsellor at Hôpital Sainte-Justine and the McGill University Health Centre for seven years, she returned to her hometown of Saskatoon to work for PreventionGenetics as their Canadian & Australasian account manager.

Rachel has spent the last nine years volunteering in various capacities for the genetic counselling profession. She has co-chaired a variety of CAGC committees, including French Language committee, Website committee and the non-clinical Community of Practice. She also spent four years volunteering with Accreditation Council for Genetic Counseling, reviewing accreditation applications for new and existing genetic counselling programs, as well as four years as treasurer for the Quebec Association of Genetic Counsellors.

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Bryn Williams-JonesBryn Williams-Jones, PhD, Bioethics Program, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health, Université de Montréal

Full Professor and Director of the Bioethics Program, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health (ESPUM) at the University of Montreal. An interdisciplinary scholar trained in Bioethics, Dr. Williams-Jones is interested in the socio-ethical and policy implications of health innovations in diverse contexts. His work examines the conflicts that arise in academic research and professional practice with a view to developing ethical tools to manage these conflicts when they cannot be avoided. Current projects focus on issues in professional ethics, public health ethics, research integrity and ethics education. Dr Williams-Jones heads the Research Ethics and Integrity Group and is Editor-in-Chief of the open access journal BioéthiqueOnline.

Speaking in:

  • Conflicts of Interest in Genetic Counselling: Challenges and Opportunities
  • Panel Discussion, Wednesday Short Course

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Ma’n H. ZawatiMa’n H. Zawati, LL.B., LL.M., Executive Director, Centre of Genomics and Policy, McGill University

Ma’n H. Zawati (LL.B., LL.M.) is a lawyer and the Executive Director of the Centre of Genomics and Policy at McGill University. He is also an Associate Member of the University’s Biomedical Ethics Unit since 2013. His research focuses on the legal and ethical aspects of biobanking as well as the legal duties and liability of health care professionals in both the clinical and research settings. He has published numerous articles on issues such as access to genomic databases, liability of genetic counsellors, the return of research results/incidental findings, the legal liability of physicians and the closure of biobanks. Mr. Zawati has also presented on these topics in Canada and internationally.

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