Sponsored Breakfasts

All 5 Industry Breakfast Seminars have been approved for 1.25 CECs from the CAGC Certification Board.

 

THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 12

7:00 – 8:15 a.m. | Industry Breakfast Sessions

 

FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 13

7:00 – 8:15 a.m. | Industry Breakfast Sessions

 

SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 14

7:00 – 8:15 a.m. | Industry Breakfast Session

 

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Experience Matters: Updates from Exome Sequencing >165,000 Clinical Samples
Thursday September 12, 7:00 – 8:15 a.m.

 

Speaker:
Jane Juusola, PhD, FACMG, Clinical Molecular Geneticists, Director of the Clinical genomics Program, GeneDx

 

Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the approach taken to analyze and interpret clinical exome data, especially in a prenatal or NICU/PICU setting.
  • Examine the reporting of clinically relevant variants that may be challenging to interrogate, including copy number variants (CNVs), mosaicism, mobile element insertions (MEIs), and variants in candidate genes.
  • Identify why reanalyzing exome data is important.

 

An inside look at the lessons learned from clinical exome sequencing (ES) of more than 165,000 samples by a diagnostic laboratory. This presentation is intended for genetic counsellors who wish to expand their exome sequencing knowledge base, especially regarding diagnostic yields for different phenotypes, the utility of rapid ES in the prenatal and NICU settings, detection of CNVs and MEIs from ES data, identification of candidate genes, and the importance of reanalysis.

 

Presented by

GeneDx

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Started with the Germline, Now We’re Here: Clinical and Laboratory Perspectives of Tumour BRCA Genetic Testing for Serous Ovarian Cancer
Thursday September 12, 7:00 – 8:15 a.m.

 

Speakers:
Melanie Care, MSc, CCGC
Jeanna McCuaig, MSc, CGC, CCGC

 

Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Summarize the experience of tumour genetic testing for high grade serous ovarian cancer from an Ontario laboratory.
  • Compare tumour and germline genetic testing results in a cohort of high grade serous ovarian cancer patients.
  • Evaluate the benefits and limitations of tumour genetic testing for high grade serous ovarian cancer.

 

The recent introduction of PARP inhibitors for the treatment of high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSO) in both germline and somatic BRCA 1/2 carriers has resulted in a rapidly changing landscape of genetic testing for women with ovarian cancer. In August 2018, Ontario introduced somatic BRCA1/2 testing as a provincially funded service, for both prevalent and incident cases of HGSO. This presentation will outline the combined first-year experiences of the TGH molecular genetics lab and PMH Familial Cancer Clinic (FCC), highlighting current and future implications of tumour-first testing for genetic counselling and genetics service delivery.

 

Presented by

AstraZeneca

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Lessons from a Clinical GC Turned Lab GC: Insights into NGS Strengths and Limitations
Friday September 13, 7:00 – 8:15 a.m.

 

Speaker:
Julie Hathaway, Clinical Liaison, Genetic Counsellor, Blueprint Genetics

 

Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe past and current limitations of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) platforms.
  • Demonstrate how such limitations might explain an uninformative genetic test result.
  • Propose additional questions and factors to consider when evaluating next steps for a family with uninformative genetic testing results.

 

Next generation sequencing (NGS) technology has revolutionized the field of clinical genetics. Many are familiar with its significant strengths, however; its clinically relevant limitations have not always been appreciated. This talk will review factors that may explain an uninformative genetic test, provide practical tips that can help genetic counsellors navigate a test’s fine print, and introduce new questions to bring to your friendly laboratory GC colleagues!

 

Presented by

Blueprint Genetics

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Moving Towards Expanded Guidelines and Increased Accessibility for Genetic Testing: Research and Experiences in Canada and the US
Friday September 13, 7:00 – 8:15 a.m.

 

Speakers:
Sienna Aguilar, MS, LCGC, Invitae
Barbara Hamilton, MS, CGC, Invitae

 

Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Assess ongoing research towards expanded access to genetic testing.
  • Review the experience and outcomes of a proactive genetic screening program in a primary care setting.
  • Describe the early experiences of utilizing a patient initiated approach to genetic testing.

 

This session will be a three part symposium related to accessibility in genetic testing. A speaker from Invitae, Barbara Hamlington, will first discuss ongoing research in support of expanding guidelines in genetic testing. A speaker from Medcan, Jill Furnival, will then discuss experiences from a proactive genetic screening program that includes genetic screening for healthy individuals. Finally, a speaker from Invitae, Sienna Aguilar, will discuss early experiences from creating a self-guided ordering workflow that provides patients with access to genetic testing, reviewed and approved by independent genetic counselors and physicians.

 

Presented by

Invitae

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The Clinical Utility of Genetic Testing in Autism Spectrum Disorder: When Findings Impact Care
Saturday September 14, 7:00 – 8:15 a.m.

 

Speaker:
Dr. Greg Fischer, Ph.D., Human Molecular Geneticist, PreventionGenetics

 

Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the genetic diversity behind autism spectrum disorders and the growing list of gene candidates.
  • Recognize the clinical utility of genetic testing for autism spectrum disorder and related syndromes.
  • Identify examples of genes associated with autism spectrum disorder that also include secondary clinical features that may result in a change in clinical care for the patient.

 

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) encompasses several neurodevelopmental features presenting as varying degrees of social impairment, communication ability, and propensity for restricted interests and repetitive behaviors. In recent years, our understanding of the genetic components contributing to ASD has improved through the work of several large cohort studies. Through this work, an extensive list of gene candidates has been identified which has resulted in the development of large exome-based panels for testing of individuals with ASD and intellectual disability phenotypes. Some studies have also identified ASD with characteristic clinical features that result in a change in the patient’s clinical care. This webinar explores the current landscape of the genetics of ASD, the clinical utility of large gene panels in the molecular diagnosis of ASD, and presents examples of ‘actionable autism’ cases in which testing results in a change in clinical care..

 

Presented by

PreventionGenetics

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